A Clown in a Grave: Complexities and Tensions in the Works of Gregory Corso

Synopsis

Using a number of critical approaches, Michael Skau examines Gregory Corso's complex imagination, his humor, and his poetic techniques in dealing with America, the Beat generation, and death.

Skau covers the complete works of Corso, one of the four major Beat Generation writers (with Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs) who attempted to provide an alternative to what they saw as the academic forms of literature dominating American writing through the 1940s and 1950s. The Beat option focused on ordinary people, spurning the cultural pretensions of the intelligentsia and using common language as well as the rhythms of actual speech. Corso, abandoned as a child by his mother, subjected to a variety of foster homes, and imprisoned as an adolescent, became an authentic voice of America's neglected streetwise youth. He embodies much of the tension, confusion, and rebellion that emerged in America after World War II and eventually crested in the 1960s.

Corso effectively articulates the complex feelings of the Beat Generation. In an age that prizes scientific, rational thought, Corso celebrates erratic, surreal, irrational behavior, preferring feeling to thought. Raised Catholic, he retains vestiges of his rejected religious training. Recognizing the advantages of democracy, he laments America's failure to live up to its ideals. A major Beat Generation writer, he nonetheless criticizes the directions, goals, and motives of that group, especially in his novel, The American Express.

Corso emphasizes social issues, yet risks undermining this significance by using wit, wordplay, and humor. While conceding mortality, he is adamant in refusing to acknowledge death's power.Even as he rebels against conventional literature, he still is enchanted by classicism and romanticism, often borrowing their techniques and idioms. Skau examines these complexities and seeming contradictions throughout Corso'

Additional information

Contributors:
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Carbondale, IL
Publication year:
  • 1999