Housing Desegregation and Federal Policy

Synopsis

Housing desegregation is one of America's last civil rights frontiers. Drawing on the expertise of social scientists, civil rights attorneys, and policy analysts, these original essays present the first comprehensive examination of housing integration and federal policy covering the last two decades. This collection examines the ambiguities of federal fair housing law, the shifting attitudes of white and black Americans toward housing integration, the debate over racial quotas in housing, and the efficacy of federal programs.
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 banned discrimination in federally assisted housing, and Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 banned discrimination in most of the private housing market. Housing Desegregation and Federal Policy shows that America has made only modest progress in desegregating housing, despite these federal policies.
Providing a balanced assessment of federal policies and programs is complicated because of disagreement over the nature of the federal government's role in this area. Disagreements over the meaning of federal law coupled with white and black disinterest in desegregation have compounded the difficulties in promoting residential integration.
The authors employ research findings as well as legal and policy analysis in examining these complex issues. They consider a broad range of issues related to housing desegregation and integration, offering new sources of evidence and ideas for future research and policymaking.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • John M. Goering
  • Gary Orfield
  • Wilhelmina A. Leigh
  • James D. McGhee
  • Alexander Polikoff
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Chapel Hill, NC
Publication year:
  • 1986