Phil Sheridan and His Army

Synopsis

Philip H. Sheridan's reputation in the Civil War often overshadows his longer and more significant roles as the nation's chief Indian fighter and commander of the army. Phil Sheridan and His Army is the first comprehensive biography and study of that later career. Formed by his experience in the Civil War and Reconstruction era, Sheridan came to see himself as the instrument of the United States' social and political destiny to open the West for white settlement and development. Paul Hutton analyzes Sheridan's relations with his subordinates, the institutional nature of his army, his campaigns, the logistics of them, and the special circumstances of defeating, pacifying, relocating, and negotiating with the Indians. At the same time, Gilded Age politics and laissez-faire capitalism shaped the grim future of the Indian- and of Sheridan's beleagured quasi-peacetime army. This definitive, abundantly illustrated history also fills out other sides of General Sheridan, who commanded Chicago after its great fire, quelled its labor riots, launched Buffalo Bill Cody on his career, served as an observed in the Franco-Prussian War, played a key role in the 1876 election crisis, and championed a national park system free from commercial exploitation.