Women without Class: Girls, Race, and Identity

Synopsis

"Pathbreaking and original. Bettie's comparative analysis of race, class, and gender performance is unparalleled in current scholarship."--Angela Valenzuela, author of "Subtractive Schooling: U.S.-Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring

"What a wonderful book! It deserves to be placed next to Paul Willis' "Learning to Labour--or in front of it. Bettie seamlessly weaves bold theoretical arguments together with a nuanced portrayal of senior high school girls, Anglo and Mexican, working-class and middle-class--or in their words, the preps, hicks, smokers/rockers/trash and the Mexican preps, cholas/cholos, hard-cores, and las chicas. Her book is equally a challenge to feminists who can see only gender, and theorists of class and race who cannot see gender at all. It is one of the finest empirical and conceptual discussions of how gender, race, and class intersect. It is also a page-turner, lucidly and often movingly written."--Elizabeth Long, author of "From Sociology to Cultural Studies: New Perspectives

"Julie Bettie has written an extraordinary book. Engagingly written, empathetic, and filled with insight, "Women Without Class makes a clear and convincing case that essentialized concepts of race and gender are not only inaccurate, but even worse, part of the ideological structure that renders class invisible. Bettie's book sets a new standard of excellence for studies of schooling and social identities."--George Lipsitz, author of "American Studies in a Moment of Danger

"In this fresh and realistic book, Julie Bettie tells us uncomfortable, but important truths about the lives of young women in an American high school. Within the kaleidoscope of gender and ethnic identities areinjuries, exclusions, and the powerful (though often hidden) effects of class. This is a book to be read by everyone who wants to understand contemporary youth."--R.W. Connell, author of "Gender and Power: Society, the Person