Objects and Persons

Synopsis

'With style and wit, Merricks stakes out an original position and defends it with an abundance of interesting, carefully formulated arguments. His book is sure to be one of the standard points of reference for the growing number of philosophers interested in these issues.' -Michael B. Burke, Philosophical Review'The argument is densely woven, ingeniously defended... Merricks is a first-rate young philosopher with a book that deserves the attention of anyone interested in the metaphysics of human persons. There is much to be learned simply figuring out how best to resist Merrick's finely wrought argument... Perhaps few readers will cease believing in baseballs. But the proportion of readers convinced has never been a good measure of the value of a book of metaphysics.' -Dean W. Zimmerman, Times Literary Supplement'Objects and Persons presents a metaphysical vision of great power and originality. It is marvellously subversive, threatening comfortable assumptions at every turn. Yet it is all backed by sober argument. These matters cry out for further exploration. Above all, the book shows that the ontology of material objects has surprisingly important and far-reaching consequences. There can no longer be any doubt about its place as a central topic in philosophy.' -Eric Olson, Philosophical BooksObjects and Persons presents an original theory about what kinds of things exist. Trenton Merricks argues that there are no non-living inanimate macrophysical objects -- no statues or rocks or chairs or stars -- because they would have no causal role over and above the causal role of their microphysical parts. Humans do exist: we have non-redundant causal powers. Along the way, Merricks has interesting things to say about mental causation, free will, and various philosophical puzzles. Anyone working in metaphysics will enjoy this lucid and provocative book.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • Trenton Merricks
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Oxford
Publication year:
  • 2001