Some Problems of Philosophy: A Beginning of An Introduction to Philosophy

Synopsis

With the clarity that James deemed obligatory, Some Problems of Philosophy outlines his theory of perception. The early chapters expose the defects of intellectualism and monism and the advantages of empiricism and pluralism. The novelty that enters into concrete perceptual experience, and that is disallowed by the rationalizing intellect, suggests exciting possibilities. Denied any absolute truth in an ever-changing world, privy to only a piece of the truth at any given moment, the individual can, with faith and good will, help create order out of chaos. Some Problems in Philosophy, published posthumously, represents an important advance in William James's thought.
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Additional information

Contributors:
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • New York
Publication year:
  • 1911
Subjects: