Restorative Justice and Responsive Regulation

Synopsis

Braithwaite's argument against punitive justice systems and for restorative justice systems establishes that there are good theoretical and empirical grounds for anticipating that well designed restorative justice processes will restore victims, offenders, and communities better thanexisting criminal justice practices. Counterintuitively, he also shows that a restorative justice system may deter, incapacitate, and rehabilitate more effectively than a punitive system. This is particularly true when the restorative justice system is embedded in a responsive regulatoryframework that opts for deterrence only after restoration repeatedly fails, and incapacitation only after escalated deterrence fails. Braithwaite's empirical research demonstrates that active deterrence under the dynamic regulatory pyramid that is a hallmark of the restorative justice system hesupports, is far more effective than the passive deterrence that is notable in the stricter "sentencing grid" of current criminal justice systems.

Additional information

Contributors:
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • New York
Publication year:
  • 2002