The Intertexture of Apocalyptic Discourse in the New Testament

Synopsis

The essays in this volume identify apocalyptic discourse in the New Testament and examine its intertexture, that is, what the apocalyptic discourse represents, refers to, and uses of phenomena outside itself. Intertexture includes references in the Hebrew Bible, intertestamental texts, and Greco-Roman literature, as well as related social and cultural phenomena. Contributors identify the biblical writer s selection and use of the intertextural references in argumentative strategies in apocalyptic discourse. They identify topics and argumentation that might be distinctive to apocalyptic discourse, refining the definition of the apocalyptic genre and determining more precisely the social and cultural placement of early Christianity. This volume arises out of a special session of the Rhetoric and the New Testament Section of the Society of Biblical Literature 1999 Annual Meeting. The contributors to the volume are include L. Gregory Bloomquist, David A. deSilva, James D. Hester, Edith M. Humphrey, B. J. Oropeza, Vernon K. Robbins, Russell B. Sisson, Wesley Hiram Wachob, and Duane F. Watson. Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).