Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Youth

Synopsis

Though it may seem hard to believe, it took America's lawmakers some 110 years before they crafted legislation aimed at protecting the welfare of children. Eventually, laws were passed to aid and protect children. This ideal student reference examines and explains in detail 20 such laws that have affected America's youth in various ways. A discussion of the history and impact of each law is followed by a carefully edited version of the law itself. Examples include the National School Lunch Act, which provided free or reduced-cost meals to young students; the Uniform Drinking Age Act, which set the national drinking age at 21; the Fair Labor Standard Act, the first successful federal attempt to regulate child labor; and the Selective Service Act, which required young men to register for the draft.

The landmark laws are divided into three parts: Health and Welfare Laws, Citizenship and Democratic Participation Laws, and Education Laws. The laws are organized chronologically within each section. An introductory overview examines the history of children's issues in federal legislation and explores reform movements and the advocacy of children's concerns. The introduction also makes manifestly clear that students are not an unempowered constituency, and have ample opportunities to make their voices heard. A timeline and appendix will also aid student research, making this volume an indispensable guide to America's laws concerning its young people.

Additional information

Contributors:
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Westport, CT
Publication year:
  • 2002