Science, Religion, and the Human Experience

Synopsis

The relationship between science and religion is generally depicted in one of two ways. In one view, they are locked in an inevitable, eternal conflict in which one must choose a side. In the other, they are separate spheres, in which the truth claims of one have little bearing on the other. This collection of provocative essays by leading thinkers offers a new way of looking at this problematic relationship. The authors begin from the premise that both science and religion operatein, yet seek to reach beyond, specific historical, political, ideological, and psychological contexts. How may we understand science and religion as arising from, yet somehow transcending, human experience? The volume is divided into four sections. The first takes a fresh look at the relationshipbetween science and religion in broad terms: as spheres of knowledge or belief, realms of experience, and sources of authority. The other three sections take on topics that have been focal points of conflict between science and religion: the nature of the cosmos, the origin of life, and the workings of the mind. Ultimately, the authors argue, by seeing science and religion as irrevocably tied to human experience we can move beyond simple either/or definitions of reality and arrive at a morerich and complex view of both science and religion.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • James D. Proctor
  • Bruno Latour
  • Thomas A. Carlson
  • Hilary Putnam
  • Jeffrey Burton Russell
  • James D. Proctor
  • Bruno Latour
  • Thomas A. Carlson
  • Hilary Putnam
  • Jeffrey Burton Russell
  • Daniel C. Matt
  • Harold H. Oliver
  • John Hedley Brooke
  • Michael Ruse
  • Ronald L. Numbers
  • Pascal Boyer
  • Evan Thompson
  • Anne Harrington
  • B. Alan Wallace
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • New York
Publication year:
  • 2005