Fighting Corruption in Developing Countries: Strategies and Analysis

Synopsis

• Features a sectoral, rather than holistic, approach to examining the dynamics of corruption

• Contains lessons from national and international experience on best practices to contain corruption in these sectors

• Offers practical policy considerations to design effective anti-corruption strategies

Corruption is a worldwide phenomenon, but especially plagues developing countries and those in democratic transition. This timely collection presents a sector-by-sector analysis of the problems that stunt economic growth, distort governance, limit civic and democratic participation, and infuriate the populace.

In stark contrast to standard holistic studies of corruption, Fighting Corruption in Developing Countries argues that examining the issue through the lens of nine key development sectors--education, agriculture, energy, environment, health, justice, private business, political parties and public finance--will help us to understand the problem realistically and identify concrete initiatives that are likely to have an impact.

The book concludes with practical and policy-oriented suggestions for corruption control that minimize the risk of "recorrupting" forces that often threaten to reverse gains. Students, researchers, and practitioners interested in implementing effective and realistic solutions to fighting corruption will find this book essential reading.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • Bertram I. Spector
  • Mary Noel Pepys
  • Verena Blechinger
  • Taryn Vian
  • David W. Chapman
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • West Hartford, CT
Publication year:
  • 2005