Religion and International Law

Synopsis

One of the great tasks, perhaps the greatest, weighing on modern international lawyers is to craft a universal law and legal process capable of ordering relations among diverse people with differing religions, histories, cultures, laws, and languages. In so doing, we need to take the worlds peoples as we find them and not pretend out of existence their wide variety. This volume, now available in paperback, builds on the eleven essays edited by Mark Janis in 1991 in The Influence of Religion and the Development of International Law, more than doubling its authors and essays and covering more religious traditions. Now included are studies of the interface between international law and ancient religions, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as essays addressing the impact of religious thought on the literature and sources of international law, international courts, and human rights law.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • David J. Bederman
  • Frederick Tse-Shyang Chen
  • Ved P. Nanda
  • Shabtai Rosenne
  • Gamal M. Badr
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Boston
Publication year:
  • 2004