Music of the Raj: A Social and Economic History of Music in Late Eighteenth-Century Anglo-Indian Society

Synopsis

'An important study of cultural exchange as well as of gender issues concerning Western society transplanted to what was rapidly emerging as the jewel in the imperial crown.' -Music and Letters'Stimulating blend of social and musical history... draws on a superbly rich collection of sources... Woodfield's book takes its place alongside the best of documentary studies of socio-musical history.' -British Journal of Ethnomusicology'This work will become a central source for all those interested in the social history of the British in India and wider issues to do with the nature of musical acculturation, music education, gender studies and the history of ethnomusicology.' -Times Higher Education Supplement'Excellent study... This is an important work that sheds new light on the processes of music-making in the British community in late 18th-century India... rich in detail... Woodfield draws a vivid and fascinating picture of these times.' -Times Higher Education Supplement'This is an endlessly fascinating book, full of new insights... and obviously the product of patient and persevering research... The correspondence between all the players is quoted at generous length and illuminating detail, and accompanied by clear and incisive commentaries.' -Early Music'Delightful book... Ian Woodfield's solid achievement is a product of canny scholarship: the ability to select and relate evidence, to discern telling detail, structure an argument, and to write with a style worthy of his protagonists.' -Times Literary SupplementMusic of the Raj provides a colourful portrait of daily musical life in the late eighteenth century. Based on unpublished Anglo-Indian correspondence, Woodfield illustrates in fascinating detail the musical activities of a group of English employees of the East India Company, in Calcutta and London, at that time.