Wounded Hearts: Masculinity, Law, and Literature in American Culture

Synopsis

From the Civil War to the early twentieth century, Travis traces the history of men and emotions in American discourse. She argues that injury became a comfortable vocabulary--particularly among white middle-class men--through which to articulate and to claim a range of emotional wounds. Debates about injury that flourished in the cultural arenas of medicine, psychology, and the law spilled over into the realm of fiction, Travis demonstrates, in works by Stephen Crane, William Dean Howells, Willa Cather, Henry James, and Edith Wharton.

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