Accumulating Insecurity: Violence and Dispossession in the Making of Everyday Life

Synopsis

Accumulating Insecurity examines the relationship between two vitally important contemporary phenomena: a fixation on security that justifies global military engagements and the militarization of civilian life, and the dramatic increase in day-to-day insecurity associated with contemporary crises in health care, housing, incarceration, personal debt, and unemployment.

Contributors to the volume explore how violence is used to maintain conditions for accumulating capital. Across world regions violence is manifested in the increasingly strained, often terrifying, circumstances in which people struggle to socially reproduce themselves. Security is often sought through armaments and containment, which can lead to the impoverishment rather than the nourishment of laboring bodies. Under increasingly precarious conditions, governments oversee the movements of people, rather than scrutinize and regulate the highly volatile movements of capital. They often do so through practices that condone dispossession in the name of economic and political security.

Additional information

Includes content by:
  • Shelley Feldman
  • Gayatri A. Menon
  • Charles Geisler
  • Martha T. McCluskey
  • Julie A. Nice
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Athens, GA
Publication year:
  • 2011