Cultural Negotiations: The Role of Women in the Founding of Americanist Archaeology

Synopsis

This meticulously researched reference work documents the role of women who contributed to the development of Americanist archaeology from 1865 to 1940. Between the Civil War and World War II, many women went into anthropology and archaeology, fields that, at the beginning of this period, welcomed and made room for amateurs of both genders. But over time, the increasingly professional structure of these fields diminished or even obscured the contributions of women due to their lack of access to prestigious academic employment and publishing opportunities. As a result, a woman archaeologist during this period often published her research under her husband's name or as a junior author with her husband.

In Cultural Negotiations archaeologist David L. Browman has scoured the archaeological literature and archival records of several institutions to bring the stories of more than two hundred women in Americanist archaeology to light through detailed biographies that discuss their contributions and publications. This work highlights how the social and cultural construction of archaeology as a field marginalized women and will serve as an invaluable reference to those researchers who continue to uncover the history of women in the sciences.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • Regna Darnell
  • Stephen O. Murray
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Lincoln, NE
Publication year:
  • 2013