Scot Who Had His Finger on the Pulse of Crime; 50 YEARS ON, LAW ENFORCEMENT PIONEER FINALLY MAKES HIS MARK ON HISTORY

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Byline: RACHEL SNOWDEN

HE was responsible for a major discovery which revolutionised law enforcement, yet a Scots fingerprint expert died in obscurity after others took the credit.

Now more than a half a century after the death of Dr Henry Faulds, his contribution to the science of human identification will be acknowledged in a new book that aims to put the record straight.

New York author Colin Beaven stumbled upon the story of Dr Faulds and his work while researching the history of fingerprinting by surfing the Internet.

He found the Enterprise Ayrshire website which mentions the forgotten innovator, who was born and bred in the Ayrshire town of Beith. Mr Beaven contacted the enterprise company and local historians for more information about Dr Faulds, and now plans to highlight his world-changing contribution to crime-solving in his book. 'I want to put the record straight,' the author said.

Dr Faulds, who was born in 1843, was the first person to recognise the uniqueness of the fingerprint and its potential for catching criminals and establishing the innocence of suspects.

Later research would reveal that the chances of two people having the same prints were 64 billion to one against. …