Death Claims Alcoholism Pioneer Frank A. Seixas

Article excerpt

Another pioneer in the recognition and treatment of alcoholism has passed on. Frank A. Seixas, M.D., who for ten years was the medical director and director for research and evaluation for the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD), died on May 8, 1992.

In 1972m Dr. Seixas developed the "Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism" in 1972, which appeared in three medical journals and many foreign publications. In addition, he taught, lectured and wrote extensively on all aspects of alcoholism, including diagnosis, treatment, epidemiology, prevention and heredity. he founded and edited two professional journals and physician's newsletter.

Throughout his medical career, he campaigned vigorously for the recognition of alcoholism as a treatable disease. His efforts were particularly successful within the medical community, convincing many physicians to treat alcoholism as a health problem, not a moral weakness.

George C. Dimas, former NCADD executive director praised his pioneering efforts. "He was a creative, innovative medical pioneer in getting the medical community to recognize alcoholism as a treatable disease. He also was one of the first physicians to establish programs to study Fetal Alcohol Syndrome."

Jokichi Takamine, M.D., long-time medical colleague remembered Dr. Seixas as a visionary. "Frank elevated alcoholism to a new level; a level of understanding and acceptance. His dedication, vision and insight was an inspiration to the entire medical community. He took a disease that was ignored and misunderstood, and made it acceptable and respectable. He was a true giant in this field."

Dr. Seixas, who was 72, died of Alzheimer's disease at the Cabrini Nursing Home in Dobbs Ferry, NY. He is survived by his wife Judith, and their three children, Noah, Peter and Abbey.

* FIELD BRIEFS: Dr. Jurt W. Donsbach, well known medical author and nutritionalist, has announced the opening of the Drew-Donsbach Alcohol Rehab Center in Bonita, California, near San Diego. The program will incorporate a new technique, using the intravenous introduction of enzyme modulators coupled with nutritional detoxificants, a medical treatment pioneered in South Africa. (Contact: 619/475-0716) . . . The J.M. Foundation has awarded $25,000 to the National Treatment Consortium for Alcohol and Other Drugs in Washington, DC for the development of a "White Paper on the Quality of Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment" . . . The Martin Institute has produced two slide shows on the marketing of alcohol to Latinos and African-Americans. "Pure Life? Pure Lies! The Alcoholic Beverage Industry's Targeting of Latinos" and "Lie, Cheat & Steal: How the Alcohol Industry Markets to African-Americans" are programs designed to inspire people to action, showing how communities can fight back. (Contact: The Marin Institute, 24 Belvedere St., San Rafael, CA, 415/456-5692) . . . A New York state program which successfully screens hospital patients for alcohol problems has been named a semi-finalist in national competition for innovative state and local programs, sponsored by the Ford Foundation . . . the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) has published "Alcohol and Other Drugs in the Workplace," another fact sheet in a popular series that provides footnoted statistical information for legislators, educators, the media and other professionals (Contact NCADD, 12 W 21 Street, New York, NY, 10010, 212/206-6770) . . . and the President's Drug Advisory Council has developed a program called "Drugs Don't Work" to encourage every business in America to make their workplace drug-free. …