07/07: War on Britain: MY PASSENGERS ARE DEAD.. MY PASSENGERS ARE ALL DEAD - BUS DRIVER GEORGE PSARADAKIS; Hero Breaks Down after Dragging Victims from Carnage of the No30

Article excerpt

Byline: By LORRAINE FISHER

MINUTES after his bus was blown apart, hero driver George Psaradakis rang his wife crying 'My passengers are dead, all my passengers are dead'.

George, 49, staggered from his cab and risked his life pulling people from the wreckage of his No 30 double decker.

But seeing the mangled and broken bodies became too much and he phoned home, overcome by shock and grief.

His wife Androulla told how he had sobbed as he told her of the horror.

The mother-of-two said: "The phone rang and it was my husband crying. He was saying 'My passengers are dead, all my passengers are dead'. It's all he could say.

"He was in such shock, I was worried for him. He felt so responsible for them but there was nothing he could do." Thirteen people died when the top deck of the bus was blown off at Tavistock Square in London's West End.

Others, including George, escaped from the carnage, some seriously injured.

Last night, he said: "It's a miracle I'm still alive. The bus was just blown away but I don't have any injuries." He was taken to hospital but did not need treatment.

George, a Greek Cypriot who has a 15-year-old daughter Christina and son Mario, 13, had gone to work early on Thursday morning to drive the Number 30 bus route from the East End into Central London. He has been a bus driver for 20 years and has worked for Stagecoach for the last three. He had only just returned to work after a heart attack and it was his first day back behind the wheel.

Androulla said: "My husband's been saved by a miracle. He carries a picture of Mary, mother of Jesus, around with him at all times and I think that's what saved him.

"When I spoke to him on the phone at the hospital he said: 'The picture saved my life'.

"The police said the bomb had been on the top of the bus at the back and that's what saved him. Had it been at the front, who knows what would have happened." Androulla, who lives in Stoke Newington, North London, said a friend had called on Thursday morning to tell her a bomb had exploded on a bus in Central London. She immediately sensed it was her husband's.

She said: "I just had a feeling. But there was nothing I could do. …