Company's Search Leads to Innovation; uReveal Patents Technology That Makes Analyzing Data an Easier Endeavor

Article excerpt

Byline: TIMOTHY J. GIBBONS

A couple of years ago, Ren Mohan was working out of a small Southside office, hoping to solve a problem that wasn't even yet that big: How to deal with the mass of data that computers allow us access to?

In the years since then, the question has gotten more dire, and Mohan's answer has become more welcome.

"We were awfully early," Mohan said, pointing out that search technology - finding and making sense out of mounds of data - has since become a major part of the Internet. As it has, it's provided the base for the company Mohan co-founded to grow.

Last week, the Jacksonville-based company received its second patent for the technology at the heart of its products. At the same time, it is about to embark on a stronger marketing push, changing its name from Intelligenxia to the more customer-friendly uReveal and rolling out a desktop version of its software called uReka!.

uReka! and the companion workstation product sit on top of search engines, expanding the type of data that can be searched and automating the process of finding patterns and connections between pieces of data.

The company's products promise to make it easier to deal with data, particularly unstructured data. Programs like spreadsheets and databases are designed to work with structured data: a list of addresses, say, or a ranking of income, not a bunch of words.

Mohan came up with the idea that led to uReveal while working as a consultant and seeing data being thrown away because they couldn't be analyzed. A bank he worked with, for instance, was able to tell which areas had the worst customer satisfaction ratings but couldn't correlate the comment fields customers filled out to say why they were dissatisfied.

The company's showcase example is the programs's usage by the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, which uses IxReveal Workgroup to crunch through police reports, looking at structured data like addresses as well as unstructured information like the text boxes officers fill out. …