American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (2008). Adapted Physical Education Assessment Scale-II (APEAS II)

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American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (2008). Adapted Physical Education Assessment Scale-II (APEAS II)

Reston, VA: American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (1900 Association Drive, 20191; [800] 213-7193, [703] 476-3430, FAX [703] 476-9527, e-mail: aapar@aahperd.org; website: www.aapar.org; download electronic versions; professional [$95.00--1-10 users; $85.00--11-20 users; $75.00--21-30 users; $65.00 31+]; university/college [$395.00], plus handling fee, orders of $50-$100.00, $10.25; $100-$500.00, 10% of total cost; over $500.00+ call for pricing.

The Adapted Physical Education Assessment Scale-II (APEAS II) is the revision of a test used for over 25 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The APEAS II was developed in cooperation with the Los Angeles Unified School District and is available through AAPAR. While the test is based on scores of students in the general school population, its greatest use has been to identify students to receive special education services in adapted physical education. The revision has been a 3-year project with an effort to enlist the help of over 140 data collectors from across the country and the 70 itinerant adapted physical educators in the LAUSD. Currently, approximately 2,300 data sets have been included across all age groups resulting in norms for ages 4.6 to 17 years, making this one of the few motor tests that provides norms for high-school age children.

One unique feature of APEAS-II is that the test measures four areas of motor performance, including perceptual motor function, object control, locomotor skills, and physical fitness. Most adapted physical education tests cover only one of these areas although the perceptual motor items only cover a few key areas (i.e., ocular control, imitation of movement, and standing balance). Another unique feature of APEAS-II is a measure of adaptive behaviors, those behaviors that, in spite of adequate motor performance, limit a student's ability to safely and successfully participate in general physical education. This is a new feature of APEAS-II and can be helpful in determining appropriate placement of students with disabilities. A final unique feature of APEAS-II is the breakdown of low scores into 1, 2.5, 5, and 7.5 percent of the norming sample. The authors note that by including the raw scores at this level, it is possible to measure progress at low levels of performance and in small increments. …