Tita Cory and the Social Networking Revolution

Article excerpt

While it was People Power on EDSA that catapulted former President Cory Aquino to the highest office in 1986, it was Twitter Power when she died last August 1, 2009. “Tita Cory is dead L,” headlined one online friend in her Plurk. For the most part, it was through microblogging media like Twitter, Plurk and Facebook thatwe I learned of an event that would once again change the history of this country. For those of us enjoying internet connection at home, our routine is to check our favourite social networking sites first and then browsing the online version of the newspaper to verify the hottest news of the day. This is what living is like in the age of Web 2.0. The circumstances surrounding Tita Cory’s rise to power in 1986 and her death in 2009 served to illustrate the great technological revolution that has occurred since. In the 1980s, the Filipino people showed the world that they can overthrow a dictator and in 2009, we showed how we can galvanize ourselves once more to go to the streets, aided by tweets, Facebook status updates, blogs, and video livestreaming, among others.And what makes this all exciting? We no longer just listen to our favourite broadcasters or even browse our favourite blogs to become part of public opinion. We’ve become empowered to formulate the opinion ourselves, and it’s fine (if not interesting) even to announce mundane bits about our lives to others. An example is my friend Amy who considers it the highlight of her day to do something which she can post to her Facebook later. The reactions of her friends are gems which determine her social persona.How more focused can you get?All these developments are affirmed in the comprehensive Wave. …