From Training Company to Learning Organization: AlliedBarton Secures More Than Just Buildings by Making Employee Learning, Development, and Career Advancement Opportunities a Big Priority

Article excerpt

Every company values quality training, and many say it is paramount to organizational success. Companies in the security services industry are no exception. Training is critical to ensuring that security officers and the managers who support them are properly prepared for their daily duties as well as unexpected challenges.

The security services industry as a whole has advanced thanks to the recognition that training is critical to executing complex missions at a diverse job sites. Today, security officers are often viewed as the first line of defense. They are an important part of a facility or community's overall safety and security working in conjunction with local law enforcement as well as local fire and emergency medical responders. Security officers are the ones we often turn to for guidance and assistance in times of uncertainty or crisis.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Push aside old notions of low-skilled security officers. Thanks to training, the security services worker of the future has arrived. Today's security officer may use a Segway to patrol airports, transit stations, and campuses. And with the advent of the broadband revolution, you may find today's highly skilled and well-trained security officer piloting a host of IP-connected digital applications that include closed circuit television, life and fire safety systems, and remote online access control systems. Updates to post orders can be communicated electronically, and training can be conducted online. Today's officers are locating potential threats using technologically advanced surveillance systems, and it is important that they know how to use that technology to the maximum benefit of their customer's job site.

Today's security officers save lives, evacuate buildings, and secure and patrol every type of facility imaginable. The training is complex--it goes beyond the information needed for an officer to staff a post, and it prepares officers and managers for multiple security challenges as well as career advancement opportunities. AlliedBarton has focused on training for more than 50 years and has long been regarded as a security industry training leader. However, making the transformation from a training company to a learning organization that facilitates the learning of all its employees while continually transforming itself represented the next evolution for the company.

Challenge

While training employees is absolutely crucial to executing the day-to-day mission at security job sites, preparing our employees (and our organization) for the future means taking our training efforts to the next level.

A learning organization is more future-focused and combines basic and ongoing training and employee development and engagement initiatives into a systematic, results-oriented approach that begins even before an employee is hired. The challenge is to create and nurture a culture that reinforces the idea that there are no limits to what can be accomplished if one takes full advantage of available opportunities. Clients and prospects will see a difference in their personnel, and management teams will notice better execution by their staff, a greater sense of ownership of the customer's site, increased morale, and employees moving upward in the organization.

Solution

Genuine learning organizations see learning and development opportunities in all facets of their business and strive to constantly look ahead and ensure that everyone is taking full advantage of the learning tools important to their careers. AlliedBarton takes training beyond preparation for entry-level employees or individuals moving to new positions. The "AlliedBarton EDGE" is AlliedBarton's professionally designed and executed approach to training and development. It starts with the recruiting and screening process (for all levels) and extends throughout the organization to include not only entry-level officers but also managers, executives, and support staff. …