Information Literacy Meet

Article excerpt

MANILA, Philippines - Information policy makers and executives from Asia-Pacific Information Network (APIN) countries are in the country for the 5th APIN which opened Tuesday and will last through Friday this week. APIN, a partner of UNESCO, is committed to promote ICT literacy application information and knowledge networking, sharing of information resources, and use of international standards and best practices in communication and information. The meeting is convened by UNESCO Bangkok and the UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines in collaboration with the Asian Institute of Journalism and Communication. Organized in 2002, APIN has 19 members whose representatives meet every two years on various themes. The theme this year, Information Policy: "Information Access, Media and Information Literacy," will align APIN's Constitution with UNESCO's Information for All Program (IFAP) priorities. Representatives from APIN member countries which include China, Republic of Korea, Mongolia, Indonesia, Lao PDP, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Bhutan, India, Iran, Nepal, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, Fiji, and Maldives, will prepare an action plan for collaboration on the development of information tools and sharing of experiences.Information literacy, according to the UNESCO Regional Office in Bangkok and UNESCO-IFAP, which, over the years, have been engaged in furthering the development of information literacy and ICT tools for education, is a concept that cannot be traced to a single author or to a single research study. It reflects a convergence of ideas, among them, (1) the Dakar Framework for Action, calling for achieving a 50% improvement in literacy by 2015, especially for women, and equitable access to continuing education for adults It also calls for a renewed vision of literacy that goes beyond the limited view in the past; (2) Zurkowski, an ICT pioneer, who noted that one must be information-literate in order to survive and compete in the information society; (3) emphasis on critical thinking, learning to learn, and less emphasis on memorization of facts; (4) expanding literacy beyond reading, writing, and numeracy to computer, media, cultural literacy; (5) development of e-learning and distance education technologies, thus permitting learners to learn at home and in their own time. …