The Morning After

Article excerpt

Byline: Andrew Bast

Crowds cheer when tyrants fall, but often the problem is what comes next. NEWSWEEK's guide to 10 toppled strongmen and what followed. Here's hoping Cairo's not like Congo.

Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali

1987-2011

Twitter-fueled youth revolt

Whoever thought Washington's man in Tunis would fall and take the Arab world with him? The former intel chief was a CIA favorite, but his family's extravagance led to his downfall. The future is far from clear.

Saparmurat Niyazov

1990-2006

Vicious leaflet campaign (at least that's how it began)

Few words match a man who renamed January after himself. (He also had a statue fetish, above.) Regrettably, his fall hasn't brought better days: the country hemorrhages gas wealth.

Slobodan Milosevic

1989-2000

Rolled by 'Bulldozer Revolution'

This genocidaire brought horror to '90s Europe and died while on trial for war crimes. After the fall of the "Butcher of the Balkans," Serbia remains a hotbed of organized crime, and Kosovo's independence sparked violent protests. But at least the mass ethnic slayings are gone.

Suharto

1967-98

Virulent corruption mixed badly with an Asian financial crisis

For an iconic case study in corruption, look no further. Doing business on the archipelago meant being in with the big man. At the ripe age of 77, his racket finally imploded. Post-Suharto Indonesia is a thriving democracy and boasts a surging economy.

Mobutu Sese Seko

1965-97

Ousted by neighboring armies

He was the kleptocrat par excellence. …