Climate-Smart Agriculture for R.P

Article excerpt

MANILA, Philippines - Climate change is upon us, and the whole world is seeing its destructive impact.

The Philippines, one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change because of its numerous active volcanoes, geographic faults, and its location on the path of typhoons, has already suffered the disastrous results of climate change on lives, livelihood, and food security.

On average, more than 1,000 lives are lost to natural disasters in the country every year, with typhoons accounting for 74 percent of the fatalities, 62 percent of the total damage, and 70 percent of agricultural damage, reflecting their high annual frequency.

The country, according to the Presidential Task Force on Climate Change (PTFCC), has been experiencing temperature spikes brought about by climate change. Warming is experienced most in the northern and southern regions of the country, while Metro Manila has warmed less than most parts. The regions which have warmed the most (Northern Luzon, Mindanao) have also dried the most. Largest precipitation trends are about 10 percent during the 20th century.

The PTFCC said extreme weather events have also occurred more frequently since 1980. These were the deadly and damaging typhoons, floods, landslides, severe El Nino and La Nina events, drought, and forest fires. The adversely affected sectors include agriculture, fresh water, coastal and marine resources, and health.

The task force has identified agriculture as the sector most affected by tropical cyclones. The highest ratio of tropical cyclone damage to agricultural output was 4.21 percent in 1990, followed in 1988 by 4.05 percent. Typhoon damage rose to more than 1 percent of the Philippines' total economic output or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 1984, 1988, and 1990 (at 1.17%, the highest).

The decline in production and productivity will possibly threaten the country's food security. For several years, the Philippines had been one of the world's largest importers of rice because local production has not been able to fill domestic demand.

The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has noted that climate change poses many threats to agriculture, including the reduction of agricultural productivity, production stability, and incomes in areas of the world that already have high levels of food insecurity and limited means of coping with adverse weather. …