Northern Exposure: The Rochdale Grooming Case Fuelled the Idea That Asian Muslim Men Routinely Abuse Vulnerable Young White Girls. Yet It Reveals So Much More about British Attitudes to Sexual Exploitation

Article excerpt

"Just because we live here, it doesn't alter our standards in morals," Joe says as he hands me a mug of tea. We're sitting in his living room at the front of a neat council semi in Heywood, on the outskirts of Rochdale in Greater Manchester. Four years ago, his 15-year-old daughter fell victim to a gang of men who were grooming young teenage girls for sex. In May this year, after an agonising and protracted struggle to bring the case to trial, nine of the men were convicted of offences ranging from rape to trafficking and "conspiracy to engage in sexual activity with a child".

It was not the first such case to come to light in Britain, but the trial provoked outraged coverage, pundits reaching for quick and easy ways to explain the terrible crime. To some, race or religion played a defining role--all five of the victims were white, while their abusers were all Muslims of British Pakistani or Afghan origin. Others pointed to a defect of character in the girls themselves which, in the words of one commentator, made them "happy to give up their affection and their beauty to men in exchange for a packet of crisps or a bit of credit on their mobile phone".

For Joe, it is this blaming of the victims that hurts most. The mantra, originating from police officers, has been that the girls came from "chaotic, council estate backgrounds", as if this somehow lessened the crimes, or explained them. "[My daughter] wasn't a bad kid," Joe says. "She wasn't into stealing or shoplifting. And she certainly didn't ask for it. No matter what you think of society and the way it's going, girls aren't that cheap. We're talking about children. And it could be anybody's children."

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It was the summer of 2008 when Joe and his wife--married for the best part of 20 years--began to notice that something was wrong with their eldest daughter. She was cheekier than her siblings, and a bit more mischievous, Joe says, but she would socialise with her family and always be home by ten at night. That July, however, her behaviour changed "almost overnight". The girl became withdrawn and stopped doing what she was told. She would use "coarse and vulgar language" in front of her family, and started to come home tipsy or, at times, much more seriously drunk. After a family argument, she moved out of home to stay with one of her friends.

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Yet nothing prepared Joe and his wife for what they would discover a few weeks later, one night in August. The police phoned to say that their daughter had been arrested on suspicion of criminal damage--she had smashed up the counter of the Bald House takeaway in Heywood. When detectives began to interview her, however, she poured out an awful story: she had been raped, on repeated occasions, by a gang of men. They would ply her with vodka or beer and threaten her with violence if she did not do as she was told. Was she telling the truth? Joe had arrived to collect his daughter from the police station and he remembers how, on their way out of the interview room, an officer turned to his daughter and said, "I believe you, because there's somebody else come into the station and said the same thing."

By accident, officers had stumbled on a crime of frightening proportions. Girls as young as 12 or 13 were being trafficked around the north-west of England. Men who worked in the takeaway trade or as taxi drivers--professions that gave them unsupervised access to young teenagers--were grooming girls by offering them gifts, slowly winning their trust, and then forcing them to have sex. Some victims were driven between Rochdale, Oldham, Bradford and elsewhere to have sex with men for money. Others were duped into thinking they were in a relationship.

Many of the abusers were known only by their nicknames: "Master", "Tiger", "Car Zero", "the Ugly One". The gang employed a teenage girl--her peers nicknamed her "the Honey Monster"--to lure in fresh victims. …