Woman's Hour

Article excerpt

Fifty Shades of Feminism

Edited by Lisa Appignanesi, Rachel Holmes and Susie Orbach

Virago, 336pp, [pounds sterling]12.99

In 2013, feminism is at a crucial moment. In the west, the dreaded "30 per cent problem" is looming: because some gains have been made, there are fewer stark, staring injustices to stir the troops to action. (It's named after the idea that once female representation in a particular area reaches a third, many people feel that that's fair--or even that there are too many women around.) In countries such as Tunisia and Egypt, meanwhile, there is a struggle to articulate a women's rights movement with its own identity, one that cannot be dismissed as an imperialist import. And for God's sake don't even mention pornography or prostitution: ask three feminists for their views on those and you'll get four opinions.

On to this battlefield strides Fifty Shades of Feminism, a book that is resolutely unembarrassed about taking its name from an old-fashioned romance novel, albeit one with lashings of BDSM and terrible dance-based metaphors. I should say that I love the idea of this book and I love that it got published. It feels as though there's a greater energy to the feminist movement now than I've experienced before in my adult life; there's a critical mass of women who just won't shut up about the things they care about.

That said, there are a few, perhaps inevitable, problems with a collection of this kind. First, there are several references to how quickly it was pulled together and the book seems to have lost count of its contributors somewhere along the way. Instead of so shades, the back cover lists 56 names and there's a further essay by a young, feminist prizewinner tucked away at the back. Hey, who cares? Maths is for dudes, anyway. (This is a feminist JOKE. Don't write me letters.)

The bulging list of contributors suggests that the editors might have had to cope with some high-level ego-management; and, because of the format, there are some crunchy gear changes. (Try going from Camila Batmanghelidjh ending a piece with "I'm a drunken whore with alternative boobs!" to Bidisha's stern list of woman-hating behaviour such as "belittling and victim-blaming" for a taste of the varying tones of contemporary feminist discourse.)

There are also occasional chapters that a harsher editor would have rejected: Shami Chakrabarti's disjointed list of heroines and Liz Kelly's technical, footnote-heavy description of the cases of Jimmy Savile and Julian Assange are the most obvious. …