Deeper into Old-Growth Debate: Books, Exhibit, Groups

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Deeper into old-growth debate: books, exhibit, groups Enormous and complex, the old-growth forest question (see our report starting on page 54) involves matters as simple as plant identification and as far-reaching as foreign trade, rain-forest ecology, and modern forest management.

The exhibit, books, and organizations listed here can help you ground yourself in many of the issues at hand.

Exhibit shows the whole picture

Staged at the World forestry Center in Portland, Old Growth Forests: Treasure in Transition is the most complete, evenhanded old-growth exhibit anywhere. It defines old growth, lays out all sides of the debate, and closes with a videotape presenting the views of different interest groups.

The exhibit, in the center's Merlo Hall, runs 9 to 5 daily through November 4. Admission is $3, $2 for seniors and ages 6 through 18. The center is just north of U.S. 26 in the Zoo/OMSI complex, about a mile west of downtown Portland.

Books that tell you where to hike

or how to unlock forest secrets

The following books can help you understand the different parts of the forest and the intricate relationships that weave them into a cohesive whole. The hiking guides directly you to some of the finest old growth on the planet.

Field guides. Cascade-Olympic Natural History, by Daniel Mathews (Raven Editions/Portland Audubon Society, Portland, 1988; $19.95).

Northwest Trees, by Stephen Arno and Ramona Hammerly (The Mountaineers, Seattle, 1977; $10.95).

Pocket Flora of the Redwood Forest, by Dr. Rudolf Becking (Island Press, Washington, D.C., 1982; $15.95).

Western Forests, by Stephen Whitney (Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1985; $14.95).

Forest ecology. Ancient Forests of the Pacific Northwest, by Elliott Norse (Island Press, Washington, D. …