War or Saddam

Article excerpt

Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

War or Saddam

"War is a dreadful thing, but there are things more dreadful even than war; one of them is dishonor."

William Randolph Hearst, former New York Democratic congressman, journalist and publisher (1863-1951)

Wake-up call

NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw, broadcasting live, continuous coverage after the first Tomahawk cruise missiles were launched into Baghdad, asked a sleepy-eyed NBC correspondent Dana Lewis awakening with the 101st Airborne Division as the sun began to rise along the Iraqi border how he first learned the U.S. military began its war to oust Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein.

Standing next to a U.S. military tent, Mr. Lewis replied that he received a telephone call "from New York."

Dixie Chicks, cont'd.

This column assumed it was doing the U.S. military and the disgraced Dixie Chicks both a favor by informing readers yesterday of a House resolution that calls on the once-popular band to play a free concert for U.S. troops in Greenville, S.C.

But little did we know how deep reaches disgust for the trio of lady singers, especially Natalie Maines, who told a concert crowd in London last week that she was "ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas."

"What makes you think that the troops would want to attend a Dixie Chicks concert even if free?" scolds Loretta Werres of Ocean View, Del. "And if our troops are still in Iraq, would the families behind want to attend? I think not."

"If the Dixie Chicks were giving a free concert at the end of the block where I live I would not go," reacts Marilyn Jameson of Pittsburgh. "They have the right of free speech, and we have the right to choose who we will patronize. The Dixie Chicks should stay in Europe I am ashamed that they call themselves Americans."

Concludes Joe Webb of Hugo, Okla.: "I hope the population turns its back on people such as these and that they find another line of work. Thank you, I think I feel better."

Two-paper family

When it comes to governing an executive branch under continuous assault by a liberal press, the first Republican governor in Maryland in more than three decades says he operates under advice given to him by President Bush and former New York Mayor Rudolph W. …