Bosnians Get Islam's Support

Article excerpt

Islamic leaders Thursday urged military aid for Bosnia's Muslims and vowed to combat religious fanaticism.

But appeals for unity were undercut by rifts among Arab participants that remained unresolved at the close of a three-day summit of the 52-member Organization of the Islamic Conference.

Jordan's King Hussein failed to gain a mention in the final document on Jordan's role in overseeing Muslim holy sites in east Jerusalem. Palestinians objected out of fear it would weaken their claim to sovereignty over that sector of the city.

Iraq was angered by a resolution calling for it to refrain from menacing its neighbors and to comply with U.N. resolutions stemming from its 1990 invasion of Kuwait.

"Despite all the goodwill efforts, we regrettably found that the Gulf war has left an open wound which has to be healed," said Morocco's King Hassan II.

Participants, who came from Europe, Asia and Africa, found some common ground. They agreed on a 182-article communique on issues ranging from terrorism in the Islamic world to technology and culture.

The plight of Bosnian Muslims united leaders. Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic attended as an observer, and his government received pledges of $300,000 to $5 million from each Islamic state.

The Bosnia resolution went beyond the expected call to lift the arms embargo. …