'Leonardo and the Last Supper,' a Portrait of Da Vinci's Times

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Inventor, painter, designer -- Leonardo Da Vinci was a brilliant man. This undeniable fact is borne out by his drawings, his notebooks, his paintings, and one fresco in particular -- "The Last Supper" in the Dominican convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan.

But, according to Ross King, it wasn't a job Da Vinci wanted.

In "Leonardo and The Last Supper," King gives you a portrait of the times behind Da Vinci and of the politics and decisions that went into the creation of the painting.

Renaissance Italy was split into many principalities -- Milan, Florence, Venice, all of which "vied to surpass one another not on the field of battle but in the taste and splendor of their accomplishments," King says.

King, noted for "Brunelleschi's Dome" and "Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling" knows how to do his research. He gives you a view of the ambitious but frustrated Da Vinci at that time. "By the age of forty-two -- and in an era when life expectancy was only forty -- Leonardo had produced only a few scattered paintings, a bizarre- looking musical instrument, some ephemeral decorations for masques and festivals, and many hundreds of pages of notes and drawings for studies he had not yet published, or for inventions he had not yet built."

Da Vinci had come to Milan a decade before, attaching himself to the court of Duke Lodovico Sforza in anticipation of creating weapons and war machines. …