Warner Bros. Donates $50,000 to OU in Memory of Alumnus

Article excerpt

Entertainment conglomerate Warner Bros. Inc. has donated $50,000 to the University of Oklahoma College of Business Administration to honor the memory of C.V. Wood Jr., a Warner Bros. executive and OU alumnus who helped found Disneyland and brought the London Bridge to the United States.

The gift will establish the C.V. Wood Jr. Business Scholarship Fund. The endowed fund will provide several scholarships each year to full-time OU juniors and seniors in the College of Business Administration who demonstrate financial need and maintain a 2.80 grade point average.

Wood, a native of Oklahoma's Woods County who attended OU from 1939 to 1941, died at age 71 in March of 1992.

"Woody was, unquestionably, not the typical, business-possessed executive," said his friend and colleague Jim House, vice president in charge of audio/visual productions for Warner Bros. theme parks. House and Wood worked together for 30 years.

"He had a zest for life, a penchant for fun and a boyish-prankster quality that has created more folklore than the combined writings of Mark Twain, Damon Runyon and Dan Jenkins," House said.

Wood was one of the original employees of Disneyland Inc. and served under Walt Disney as vice president and general manager for site selection and development, helping to determine the future home of what is now known as "The Magic Kingdom."

He became managing director during the theme park's first year of operation and is credited with establishing many of Disneyland's enduring policies.

Wood left Disneyland in 1956 to form Marco Engineering, which provided market research, design, engineering and construction for the leisure industry. The company built Pleasure Island in Boston, New York's Freedomland and the Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington.

Marco Engineering merged with McCulloch Corp., a chainsaw manufacturer, in 1961. In 1968, Wood arranged the purchase of the London Bridge by McCulloch Corp. The bridge, built in 1831, was dismantled and shipped to Lake Havasu City, Ariz., where it was reconstructed stone by stone. The London Bridge now is a popular tourist destination. …