OU Law School's National Ranking Moves Up Ladder

Article excerpt

The University of Oklahoma's College of Law ranks in the second tier nationally -- up from the fourth tier a year ago -- according to the 2001 "America's Best Graduate Schools" guide just released by U.S. News and World Report.

The law school ranking is based on a weighted average of 12 measures, including reputation, selectivity, placement success and faculty resources.

"We are very pleased at the recognition of the College of Law shown by the U.S. News and World Report rankings," said Andy Coats, dean of the college. "Moving from fourth to the second tier amply demonstrates the recent improvements made at the law school, but we will not be satisfied until we are recognized as a first-tier school."

Thomas to get honor

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas will be honored with the annual Oklahoma Citizenship Award at a dinner on May 8 at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City. The award is given annually to an outstanding American citizen by the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, an independent public policy organization.

"Clarence Thomas has time and time again proven his dedication to the principles set forth by our Republic's founding fathers," says David Brown, OCPA's board chairman. "This award reflects our appreciation for his steadfast, courageous and honorable tenure on the Supreme Court."

Thomas was born in the Pin Point community of Georgia near Savannah on June 23, 1948. He married Virginia Lamp on May 30, 1987, and has one child, Jamal Adeen, by a previous marriage. He attended Conception Seminary from 1967-1968, and received an A.B., cum laude, from Holy Cross College and a juris doctor degree from Yale Law School in 1974.

After passing the Missouri bar exam, Thomas served as an assistant attorney general of Missouri from 1974-1977. He was an attorney with the Monsanto Co. from 1977-1979 and a legislative assistant to Sen. John Danforth from 1979-1981. From 1981-1982 Thomas served as an assistant secretary for civil rights in the U.S. Department of Education, and from 1982-1990 as chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

From 1990-1991 Thomas served as a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. President Bush nominated Thomas as an associate justice of the Supreme Court, and he took his seat Oct. 23, 1991.

Past recipients of OCPA's Citizenship Award include former United Nations Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick, magazine publisher Steve Forbes, and nationally syndicated columnist Cal Thomas. OCPA is a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank which formulates public policy research and analysis consistent with the principles of free enterprise and limited government.

Tickets for the dinner are $100 each. More information is available at www

.ocpathink.org or by calling 843-9212.

OCU law alumni

Oklahoma City University's School of Law has added five new members to its Alumni Association board of directors.

The new members are Ken Sue Doerfel, 1977; Emmanuel E. Edem, 1982; Gary B. Homsey, 1974; Linda Samuel-Jaha, 1992; and Lynne F. Saunders, 1993.

Allen K. Harris, 1970, was elected to another term as president of the board.

Other members of the OCU Law Alumni Association board of directors are Sheryl N. Barr, 1990; Vicki Behenna, 1983; Ron Bussert, 1992, secretary; Patrick Jon Casey, 1974, treasurer; Cathy Christensen, 1986; M. Joe Crosthwait, 1974; David Harbour, 1966; David High, 1978, vice president; Sharon O'Roke, 1984; Jim Paddleford, 1967; Terry Pendell, 1967; Steven Tolson, 1988; Geary Walke, 1975; and Bill Warren, 1970.

In the courts

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission contends a former employee of Warren Properties Inc. was subjected to racial harassment and then fired after complaining about the behavior.

In a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, the EEOC said the worker, who is black, was subjected to racial slurs, jokes and graffiti, including messages such as "whites only" on the water fountain. …