The Bookshelf

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GENRES AND TECHNIQUES

An in-depth study of ten leading filmmakers of Japan, Audie Bock's JAPANESE FILM DIRECTORS offers an impressive and scholarly evaluation of their careers and cinematic styles as related to the progress of the country's historic motion picture development (Kodansha/Harper & Row $14.95).

Commemorating the Disney Studios' 50th anniversary are the paperback versions of Leonard Maltin's THE DISNEY FILMS, a solidly documented updated volume (Popular Library $2.25) and MICKEY MOUSE: 50 HAPPY YEARS, edited by David Bain and Bruce Harris, a colorful anthology of the best in Mickey's long history (Harmony/Crown $7.95).

In THE SINGING COWBOYS, David Rothel surveys the musical Westerns of the 30s, 40s and 50s popularized by such actors as Gene Autry, Roy Rogers and Tex Ritter. Rothel's interviews and his extensive filmography provide firsthand insight into the genre (Barnes $19.95).

The use of monumental pageantry, spectacular battles· and superhuman heroism is the subject of THE HOLLYWOOD EPIC, Foster Hirsch's knowledgeable survey of a perennial genre from Griffith's Intolerance and De Mule's King of Kings to Kubrick's Barry Lyndon (Barnes $15).

A wide-ranging selection of superb still portraits, SUPERSTARS presents large-size photographic reproductions in color and b&w of 67 screen favorites of all times, from Rudolph Valentino to Jane Fonda, with an appropriate commentary by Alexander Walker (Dutton $9.95).

NAMES ON THE SCREEN

One of the best biographies ever written-informative, thoroughly researched and highly readable-JOHN HUSTON by Alex Madsen perceptively dissects the prolific and talented director's mercurial personality in a sustained analysis of his uneven films and his impulsive lifestyle (Doubleday $10).

In THE WORLD OF LUIS BUNUEL, Joan Meilen has assembled a notable collection of essays about the director whose unique creative brilliance is assessed by fellow directors, writers, critics and Bunuel himself. Mellen's introduction is an insightful study of Bunuel's motivations, esthetics and imagery (Oxford U. Press $15/5.95).

Articulate and socially aware Charlton Heston records in THE ACTOR'S LIFE observations about himself and his films. Covering in concise entries the 1956-76 period, it illuminates the interests and concerns of a performer that often transcend his professional activities (Dutton $12.95).

Two clashing yet complementary appraisals of the late star, JOAN CRAWFORD by Bob Thomas (Simon & Schuster $10.95) and MOMMIE DEAREST by Christina Crawford (Morrow $9.95) offer frightening descents into an intense, self-centered and often paranoid personality. Thomas' book is an objective and knowledgeable biography, while the other is a scorching memoir by Joan's adopted daughter.

In RITA HAYWORTH: THE TIME, THE PLACE AND THE WOMAN, John Kobal traces a sensitive portrait of the "Love Goddess," a striking beauty whose moody boldness on screen hid a basically timid and introverted personality (Norton $12.95).

The study of a really nice guy whose success didn't go to his head (at least, so far), TRAVOLTA! …