You Said It

Article excerpt

Our story (January page 74) about one family's quest for low-tech happiness stirred debate. Post your own reaction (and watch a slideshow of the family's old-tech tools for living) at sunset.com/unpluggedhome

A really good idea?

I was so excited to read about this family because sometimes I thought my husband and I were the only people balking at the frivolousnessof so much technology. We are both public school teachers and we want our own children to be able to use their imagination and appreciate their interactions with people. So many of our students have difficulty visualizing scenes from novels and using images to portray their ideas because technology does this for them constantly. Limiting children's exposure to technology is beneficial because they must use their imagination to visualize, and interactions with technology become a treat, not background noise. -KATHLEEN JAY, POSTED AT SUNSET.COM

Many of us out here in the world go about our lives the old-fashioned way. We raised our kids outside with imaginations. They were healthy and thin naturally because they were so active. I have noticed each generation seems to collect more problems with more technology. It is fine to use as a tool, but when you have children and aduits sitting at the dinner table, texting or talking on a cell phone, it is time to do something. Hurrah for this couple who have realized the problem and are trying to fix it! -JOAN MAC, AT SUNSET.COM

Slowing down and simplifying life to enjoy pleasures such as music, reading, good food, conversation: It's a bit like bringing a spirit of vacation to daily life. And none of the above involves a gadget. -PAMELA BEERE BRIGGS, AT SUNSET.COM

Time to get real?

* Your "Unplugged" house article had to be the most privileged, pretentious article I've seen in your magazine ever. …