Envisaging CENTURIES, Great Philosophers Have Noted That Ry Repeats Itself. Sadly, in Certain Areas of the World, This Can Make a History of Conflict Difficult to Overcome. Many International Educators Today Believe That Encouraging Peace and Cooperation in Areas of Conflict Is a Priority to Create a New History for Our World- the Kind That Should Be Repeated Rather Than the Kind We'd like to Forget. This Issue's Cover Story "Peace Pathways," by Dana Wilkie, Which Is the Fourth in an Occasional Feature Series about Peace and Social Justice Issues in International Education, Focuses on How International Educators Are Taking Students to Areas of Conflict like Northern Ireland, Nepal, Kosovo, and Middle East to Help Create a New Tradition of Peacebuilding. Although Some of These Regions Are Officially "At Peace," There Are Still Wounds from Conflict That Have to Be Healed. Paul Bueno De Mesquita, Professor in Psychology and Director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies at the University of Rhode

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CENTURIES, great philosophers have noted that ry repeats itself. Sadly, in certain areas of the world, this can make a history of conflict difficult to overcome.

Many international educators today believe that encouraging peace and cooperation in areas of conflict is a priority to create a new history for our world- the kind that should be repeated rather than the kind we'd like to forget.

This issue's cover story "Peace Pathways," by Dana Wilkie, which is the fourth in an occasional feature series about peace and social justice issues in international education, focuses on how international educators are taking students to areas of conflict like Northern Ireland, Nepal, Kosovo, and Middle East to help create a new tradition of peacebuilding.

Although some of these regions are officially "at peace," there are still wounds from conflict that have to be healed. Paul Bueno de Mesquita, professor in psychology and director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies at the University of Rhode Island calls this "a state of 'negative peace'- no fighting, but no real harmony and no peaceful sense of community and coexistence among the parties. …