U.S. History as Women's History: New Feminist Essays

Synopsis

This outstanding collection of fifteen original essays represents innovative work by some of the most influential scholars in the field of women's history. Covering a broad sweep of history from colonial to contemporary times and ranging over the fields of legal, social, political, and cultural history, this book, according to its editors, 'intrudes into regions of the American historical narrative from which women have been excluded or in which gender relations were not thought to play a part.'

State formation, power, and knowledge have not traditionally been understood as the subjects of women's history, but they are the themes that permeate this book. Individually and together, the essays explore how gender serves to legitimize particular constructions of power and knowledge and to meld these into accepted practice and state policy. They show how the field of women's history has moved from the discovery of women to an evaluation of social processes and institutions.

The book is dedicated to pioneering women's historian Gerda Lerner, whose work inspired so many of the contributors, and it includes a bibliography of her works.

Additional information

Includes content by:
  • Kathryn Kish Sklar
  • Linda Gordon
  • Alice Kessler-harris
  • Mary W. Dewson
  • Nancy F. Cott
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Chapel Hill, NC
Publication year:
  • 1995