Writing and Orality: Nationality, Culture, and Nineteenth-Century Scottish Fiction

Synopsis

Speech and writing form the basis of much modern critical thinking, but there is little consensus about what they are or whether there is any essential difference between them. In this book, Fielding explores the concepts of nationality and culture in the context of 19th-century Scottish fiction, namely Walter Scott, James Hogg, R.L. Stevenson and Margaret Oliphant. Through this exploration, she concludes that the differences between speech and writing are created by social forces.