Oskar Kokoschka

Oskar Kokoschka (ôs´kär kōkôsh´kä), 1886–1980, Austrian expressionist painter and writer. After teaching at the art academy in Dresden (1920–24), Kokoschka traveled extensively in Europe and N Africa. In 1937 his works were removed from German galleries by the Nazis, who considered his work degenerate. He moved to London in 1938 and after World War II lived in Switzerland and established an international summer school in Salzburg.

Kokoschka was influenced by the elegant work of Klimt, but soon developed his own distinctive expressionist style (see expressionism). His early portraits (c.1909–14) emphasize psychological insight and tension (e.g., the portrait of Hans Tietze and his wife, 1909; Mus. of Modern Art, New York City). The same restless, energetic draftsmanship is characteristic of his expressionist landscapes and his striking posters and lithographs. His landscapes include Jerusalem (Detroit Inst. of Arts) and View of Prague (Phillips Memorial Gall., Washington, D.C.).

See his volume of watercolors, drawings, and writings (1962); reproductions of his work, comp. by B. Bultmann (1961), L. Goldscheider (1963), E. G. Rathenau (1970), and J. Tomeš (1972); biography by E. Hoffmann (1947).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Kokoschka, Life and Work
Edith Hoffmann.
Faber and Faber, 1947
The German Expressionists: A Generation in Revolt
Bernard S. Myers.
Frederick A. Praeger, 1966
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 7 "Oskar Kokoschka"
FREE! The Drama of Transition: Native and Exotic Playcraft
Isaac Goldberg.
Stewart Kidd Company, 1922
Librarian’s tip: "Oskar Kokoschka" begins on p. 313
Gateway to the Twentieth Century: Art and Culture in a Changing World
Jean Cassou; Emil Langui; Nikolaus Pevsner.
McGraw-Hill, 1962
Librarian’s tip: "Independent Expressionists: From Kokoschka to Chagall" p. 153
German Art of the Twentieth Century
Werner Haftmann; Alfred Hentzen; William S. Lieberman; Andrew Carnduff Ritchie.
Museum of Modern Art, 1957
Librarian’s tip: "Oskar Kokoschka" begins on p. 78
Collaborative Form: Studies in the Relations of the Arts
Thomas Jensen Hines.
Kent State University Press, 1991
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Six "Der Sturm Morder, Hoffnung der Frauen"
Diasporas and Exiles: Varieties of Jewish Identity
Howard Wettstein.
University of California Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Oskar Kokoschka begins on p. 126
Avant Garde Theatre, 1892-1992
Christopher Innes.
Routledge, 1993
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Oskar Kokoschka begins on p. 52
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