Hellenism

Hellenism, the culture, ideals, and pattern of life of ancient Greece in classical times. It usually means primarily the culture of Athens and the related cities during the Age of Pericles. The term is also applied to the ideals of later writers and thinkers who draw their inspiration from ancient Greece. Frequently it is contrasted with Hebraism—Hellenism then meaning pagan joy, freedom, and love of life as contrasted with the austere morality and monotheism of the Old Testament. The Hellenic period came to an end with the conquest of Alexander the Great in the 4th cent. BC It was succeeded by the Hellenistic civilization. See Greece; Greek architecture; Greek art; Greek literature, ancient; Greek religion.

See R. Warner, Eternal Greece (rev. ed. 1962); D. Garman, tr., A Literary History of Greece (1964); J. Ferguson, The Heritage of Hellenism (1973).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50-250
Simon Swain.
Clarendon Press, 1998
Hellenism and the Modern World
Gilbert Murray.
Beacon Press, 1954
Greek Ideals and Modern Life
R. W. Livingstone.
Biblo and Tannen, 1969
Librarian’s tip: Chap. II "The Growing Influence of Hellenism" and Chap. VI "Christianity and Hellenism"
Hellenic Civilization: An Historical Survey
Maurice Croiset; Paul B. Thomas.
Alfred A. Knopf, 1925
The King Is Dead: Studies in the Near Eastern Resistance to Hellenism, 334-31 B. C
Samuel K. Eddy.
University of Nebraska Press, 1961
Topographies of Hellenism: Mapping the Homeland
Artemis Leontis.
Cornell University Press, 1995
Orality and Literacy in Hellenic Greece
Tony M. Lentz.
Southern Illinois University Press, 1989
Hellenism in Ancient India
Gauranga Nath Banerjee.
Munshi Ram Manohar Lal, 1961
Macedonian Imperialism and the Hellenization of the East
Pierre Jouguet; M. R. Dobie.
Alfred A. Knopf, 1928
Hellenism and Christianity
Edwyn Bevan.
George Allen & Unwin, 1921
The Neo-Platonists: A Study in the History of Hellenism
Thomas Whittaker.
Cambridge University Press, 1928 (2nd edition)
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