Making Medical Research Available to More New Yorkers

Article excerpt

In a major new effort to translate medical research into practical and accessible treatment, Weill Cornell Medical College (WCMC) will lead a new Clinical and Translational Science Center, creating a network for biomedical collaboration on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The center will be funded through a $49 million Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health, the largest federal grant ever awarded to WCMC.

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The center will comprise a diverse group of collaborating institutions, including Cornell's College of Human Ecology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Hunter College. In addition, Cornell University Cooperative Extension--New York City (CUCE-NYC) will lead extensive outreach efforts in the city.

"There is a pressing need for broad-based multidisciplinary collaborations that can fulfill the incredible promise of recent research advances in areas like genetics and bioinformatics, and efficiently translate them into real-world interventions that benefit the community," says Cornell president David Skorton, who is a professor of internal medicine and pediatrics at WCMC.

Alan Mathios, interim dean of Human Ecology and professor of policy analysis and management, notes: "The selection of Cornell for this center recognizes the university's excellence in both science and service, and furthers the integration of Cornell's research and outreach missions. At the College of Human Ecology, we're very proud to have a role in facilitating important research that will have a real impact in people's lives, and we are excited about another collaboration that brings together Cornell's expertise across disciplines."

Innovations that result from the new center will be made widely available through national steering committees, says Julianne Imperato-McGinley, the center's principal investigator and program director. …