Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2008-2009

Article excerpt

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History and The Journal of African American History are pleased to present the list of the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers for 2008-2009. These lecturers are among the leading scholars in the field of African American history and culture.

We hope that you will begin to make plans to bring one of these speakers to your campus, institution, or fundraising activity for your ASALH branch or local cultural organization. Lecture sponsors agree to pay a $1,000 lectureship fee to The Journal of African American History ($500 of which will go to the speaker) as well as the lecturer's travel and lodging expenses (if any).

This is an important way to help support the ongoing activities of The Journal of African American History.

Derrick P. Alridge, University of Georgia at Athens

* "W.E.B. Du Bois and the Education of Black People"

* "Hip Hop as a Social and Intellectual Movement"

* "Metaphors and Symbolic Representations of Blacks in U.S. History Textbooks"

Dr. Derrick P. Alridge is Associate Professor of Social Foundations of Education at the University of Georgia, Athens. His areas of scholarship include the history of U.S. African American education, civil rights studies, and Hip Hop studies. He is currently codirector of the Foot Soldier Project for Civil Rights Studies at UGA--a research project that produces historical documentaries on the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia. Professor Alridge's work has been published in a variety of journals, including The Journal of African American History, The Journal of Negro Education, and The Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment.

Felix Armfield, Buffalo State University/SUNY

* "Eugene Kinckle Jones and the Founding of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity"

* "Eugene Kinckle Jones and Black Social Work"

* "Black Social Work Education and the Supreme Court's Gaines v. Missouri Decision, 1938"

Dr. Felix Armfield is Associate Professor of History at Buffalo State University in the Department of History and Social Studies Education. He also was a member of the faculty of Western Illinois University from 1995 to 2000. Most recently, he published the book Black Life in West Central Illinois (2001), and he is presently working on a biography of Eugene Kinckle Jones, a black social work pioneer in the early 20th century and the first executive secretary of the National Urban League, 1916-1940.

Deidre Hill Butler, Union College

* "Activist Mothering in African American Families"

* "The Split: A Womanist Interpretation of an Episode of Suburban Black Community Reconfiguration, 1904-1920"

* "Having Our Say: Teaching Black Studies to Our Community and Beyond"

Dr. Deidre Hill Butler came to Union College from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, where she earned her Ph.D. Dr. Butler's research interests include the social geography of race, class, and gender in African American social institutions in New England, and the role of African American women in contemporary stepfamilies. She has received recognition for her scholarship from the New York African-American Institute and the Massachusetts Historical League. Dr. Butler has served on the program committees for the Association of Black Sociologists and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and she is a member of the American Sociological Association. She is an active member of the Black Women's Health Project, a national black women's grassroots health initiative.

Dr. Butler contributed an essay to the 2003 ASALH Black History Kit, The Souls of Black Folk: Centennial Reflections.

Gloria Harper Dickinson, The College of New Jersey

* "From Goobers to Gumbo: Foodways of Africa and the Diaspora"

* "Marketing Afrocentricity: A Global Retrospect"

Dr. …