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Annotated Bibliography: Children's Folklore Review

Article excerpt

The Children's Folklore Review (CFR) is published twice yearly by the Children's Folklore Section (CFS) of the American Folklore Society with support from East Carolina University. The majority of each issue is composed of articles on any and all aspects of children's traditions--oral, social, customary, and material. The remainder of each issue includes the minutes of the Section's annual meeting, book reviews, materials from the Internet, and notes and announcements. CFR is a refereed journal with an international circulation and an ISSN number; articles that appear in CFR are indexed in the MLA and other major bibliographies.

The formation of the Children's Folklore Section of the American Folklore Society was discussed at a preliminary meeting in October 1977 in Detroit and its organisation formalised in the fall of 1978 in Salt Lake City. Section

members meet at the annual American Folklore Society meetings to hold elections and award prizes. The CFS annually offers the Newell Prize for the best student essay, the Aesop Prize for the children's book which most conscientiously incorporates folklore, the Opie Prize for the best book-length scholarly work in children's folklore, and a Lifetime Achievement Award. The CFS also sponsored the publication of Children's Folklore: A Sourcebook, which appeared in a striking hardcover edition from Garland in 1995 and was published in a soft cover edition from Utah State University Press in 1999.

The following articles have appeared in the first 22.5 volumes of the Children's Folklore Review (originally the Children's Folklore Newsletter). An asterisk (*) indicates that the article won the Children's Folklore Section's Newell Prize.

Arleo, Andy. "Strategy in Counting-Out: Evidence from Saint-Nazaire, France." 14.1 (1991):25-29. An examination of French counting-out techniques and how they contribute to cross-cultural studies in children's folklore.

Beresin, Ann Richman. "`Sui' Generis: Mock Violence in an Urban School Yard." 18.2 (1996):25-35. An examination of the non-violent/violent handball game of "Suicide" which argues that the hybridity of the game reflects its paradoxical status as a mixed genre and unique cultural marker.

Branigan, Michelle. "Blocks and Matchboxes: Negotiation of a Shared Reality Between Two Siblings." 16.1 (1993):3-31.(*) An examination of an episode of play between two siblings that observes the static and dynamic aspects of their interaction.

Bronner, Simon. "Expressing and Creating Ourselves in Childhood: A Commentary." 15.1 (1992):47-59. General thoughts on the evolution of the study of children's folklore and reviews of narrative articles in the same issue.

Bronner, Simon. "History and Organization of Children's Folklore in the American Folklore Society." 20.1-2 (1997-8):57-62. A discussion of the place of children's folklore in the history of the American Folklore Society.

Carnes, Pack. "Arnold Lobel's Fables and Traditional Fable Features." 15.2 (1993):3-19. An investigation of the role of traditional elements in Lobel's Fables and of the relationship between folklore and a literary text.

Carpenter, Carole H. "Developing an Appreciation for the Cultural Significance of Childlore." 17.1 (1994):19-29. A study of the ways in which childlore contributes to "the development and expression of individual, group, and national identity."

Chinery, David. "Snooping for Snipes: America's Favorite Wild Goose Chase." 10.1 (1987):3-4; 10.2 (1987):3-4. A presentation of variations on the traditional snipe hunt and conjectures about the continuance of the tradition.

Conrad, JoAnn. "Bedtime Stories." 21.1 (1998):43-53. A preliminary examination of the narrative interactions between a mother and a small child that occur as a part of a regular bedtime ritual.

Cox, Cynthia Anne. "`Postmodern Fairy Tales' in Contemporary Children's Literature." 16. …