Teacher Efficacy and Effective Teaching Behaviors in Physical Education. (Pedagogy)

Article excerpt

Research suggests that teacher efficacy can positively influence the effectiveness of teachers (Rich, Lev, & Fischer, 1996). Teachers with high teacher efficacy are more successful in their teaching and demonstrate more effective teaching behaviors than are teachers with low teacher efficacy (Tschannen-Moran, Woolfolk Hoy, & Hoy, 1998). The purpose of this study was to examine differences in teaching behaviors among preservice teachers with high teacher efficacy and those with low teacher efficacy. According to the teacher efficacy model proposed by Chase and Lirgg (2002), teachers with high teacher efficacy will provide more instructional time and a higher quality of feedback to students than teachers with low teacher efficacy. Sixteen preservice physical education teachers provided informed consent and participated in this study during their student teaching experiences. The teachers were from two universities, teaching in elementary school placements. The teachers completed the Teacher Efficacy Scale for P hysical Education (TESPE) (Chase & Lirgg, 2002) and were videotaped teaching one lesson in physical education. From the sixteen participants, the five teachers with the highest teacher efficacy scores (M = 6.12, SD = .48) and the five teachers with the lowest teacher efficacy scores (M = 4.75, SD = .55) formed the high and low efficacy groups. Results of a one-way analysis of variance indicated that the two groups were significantly different in their level of teacher efficacy, F(1, 9) 17. …