Chronology: Iraq

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IRAQ

See also, Petroleum Affairs, Regional Affairs

2001

Oct. 16: In a statement to the Iraqi New Agency, Iraqi Oil Minister Amir Muhammad Rashid demanded OPEC member states to reduce immediately their oil production by one million barrels a day in order to restore stability to the international oil market and boost prices. [WNC, 10/16]

Oct. 25: A joint delegation of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan and the Kurdistan Democratic Party met with US Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff and advisor, John Hanna, and discussed issues related to Iraqi Kurdistan. [BBC, 10/26]

Oct 28: In an interview with The Sunday Telegraph, the Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister, Tariq 'Aziz, said he was aware of US plans to attack 300 Iraqi targets with 1,000 missiles and that it was only a matter of time before Iraq was attacked by the US as part of its war on terrorism. 'Aziz commented that such an attack would inflame Arab opinion and cause the US-led coalition to fall apart. He also added that Iraq was ready to defend itself. [BBC, 10/28]

Oct 31: German authorities confirmed that Iraq moved secret agents into Germany from Eastern European countries in an operation coordinated by Iraqi diplomats in Prague, the Czech capital. [FT, 11/1]

Nov. 1: In a statement to the Iraqi News Agency, an Iraqi Foreign Ministry spokesman denied the allegations made by Czech Interior Minister Stanislav Gross that an Iraqi diplomat met with Muhammad 'Atta, the ring leader of the terrorist hijackers of September 11. [WNC, 11/1]

Nov. 15: Tariq 'Aziz received a British Parliamentary delegation headed by George Galloway, Member of the British House of Commons, who was visiting Iraq to attend the works of the sixth meeting of the Follow-up and Coordination Committee of the Baghdad Conference. During the meeting, Galloway reviewed the efforts he and his delegation were making to bring about the lifting of the embargo, imposed against Iraq. [BBC, 11/15]

Nov. 26: US President George W. Bush urged Iraq to accept the return of UN arms inspectors as proof that it was not seeking to acquire weapons of mass destruction and suggested that Iraq might be the next target of the antiterrorism campaign. …