The Supreme Court and Religion in American Life. Vol. I: The Odyssey of the Religion Clauses; Vol. II: From "Higher Law" to "Sectarian Scruples."

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American The Supreme Court and Religion in American Life. Vol. I: The Odyssey of the Religion Clauses; Vol. II: From "Higher Law" to "Sectarian Scruples." By James Hitchcock. (Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. x, 218; viii, 261. $32.95; $35.00.)

In this two-volume work, Professor James Hitchcock first provides a comprehensive survey of the Supreme Court's decisions concerning religion. He then evaluates and critiques the Court's decisionmaking, especially in the contemporary period.

In Volume I, Professor Hitchcock offers a historical survey of the Supreme Court's religion cases, from the Court's earliest decisions to those of the Rehnquist Court. He attempts to describe every case, whether prominent or obscure, offering what he calls "the most comprehensive survey of the religion cases that has yet been published" (p. 1). Hitchcock discusses cases arising not only under the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment, i.e., the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses, but also under the Free Speech Clause, other constitutional provisions, common-law doctrines, and statutes. All in all, he describes nearly 300 cases, drawn from a wide variety of contexts. In so doing, he highlights many decisions that are frequently overlooked, including decisions not relying on the Religion Clauses. For example, the Dartmouth College case of 1819 rested on the Contract Clause, but Hitchcock maintains that it served to protect the liberty of organized religious groups and, in particular, to promote the proliferation of religiously affiliated colleges.

This volume is a valuable historical resource, albeit one that is not without shortcomings. To the legally trained eye, the book's case discussions are generally accurate, but not precisely so in every particular. (For example, some cases decided under the Free Speech Clause are described at times as cases grounded on the Free Exercise Clause.) More generaEy the principal strength of this volume-its comprehensive coverage-may also be its principal weakness. Hitchcock provides a helpful synthesis and historical analysis in his conclusion, but the volume lacks an introductory summary, and its chapters are rather loosely organized, in part by topic and in part by historical period, creating something of a potpourri at times. …