The Globalization of Advertising: Agencies, Cities and Spaces of Creativity

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The Globalization of Advertising: Agencies, Cities and Spaces of Creativity By James R. Faulconbridge, Jonathan V. Beaverstock, Corinne Nativel and Peter J. Taylor (MRoutledge; 2011; 208 pages; hardcover; ISBN 978-0415567169)

This book examines how global agencies have transformed themselves in response to globalization. The authors are geography professors who combine analysis of the internal workings of agencies with an examination of how physical, social, economic and other characteristics of cities influence agencies. The authors interviewed staff of global agencies while also examining agency billings, city employment statistics and other data. The book consists of nine chapters divided into three parts: situating global advertising agencies and cities; geographies of advertising work in the twenty first century; and agency-city relationships in advertising globalization.

Chapter one tells readers how globalization has enhanced the importance of place and localization. The clients of global agencies are increasingly located away from New York, London and other western centers of advertising. The result of this change is that offices in Bangkok, Sao Paolo and other nonwestern cities now play a more important role in global agencies because they create campaigns that are more aligned with local markets. Offices in major western cities do continue to play a key role in global agencies, but their role is now primarily to facilitate collaboration and cooperation among the offices around the globe.

Most of the book focuses on the role cities play in advertising globalization. Using case studies of New York City, Detroit and Los Angeles, the authors explore the characteristics that have made some western cities thrive or decline as centers of global advertising. The authors argue that successful cities possess territorial and network assets. …