Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography

Article excerpt

Anderson, Siobhan. "ebb ocean of life, (the flow will return)." in mariana Barreto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il: transatlantic Whitman association, 2013), 15-16. ["a poem in the spirit of Walt Whitman's Sea-Drift," beginning "By some miracle / for one day / god made our water warm."]

Athenot, eric. "From Democratic Vistas." in mariana Barreto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il: transatlantic Whitman association, 2013), 59-64. [one section of W hitman's Democratic Vistas, translated into French; part of the translator's in-progress complete translation of the text.]

Barreto, mariana, and Katie hartsock, eds. I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You. evanston, il: transatlantic Whitman association, 2013. [Collection of original poems, prose, translation, and art pieces about Whit- man, each listed separately in this bibliography; with a "curatorial note" by hartsock (1-3), indicating how "this collection shows authors and artists talking back to and engaging the poet: aroused and arisen, to justify or just to be with him and his words, to become part of his ever-expanding total meaning."]

Bouldrey, Brian. "leaves of glass." in mariana Barreto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il : trans- atlantic W hitman association, 2013), 48-54. [essay about Whitman as a "maker" in the "now," "always on the make" ("making poetr y, making love, making away"); compares Whitman as a maker with the glass blower leopold Blaschka, who made delicate glass replicas of 847 plant specimens for the harvard museum of natural history.]

Byrnes, Susanne, and Cynthia Shor, eds. Starting from Paumanok . . . 26 (Spring 2013). [newsletter of the Walt Whitman Birthplace association, huntington Station, ny, with news of association events.]

Carlsmith, Caroline. "Calamus." in mariana Barreto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il : trans- atlantic Whitman association, 2013), 17. [Fold-out reproduction of ink drawing of calamus grass.]

Carlsmith, Caroline. "one hundred possible Works Because i am in love with Walt Whitman." in mariana Barreto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il: transatlantic W hitman association, 2013), 6-14. [poem, beginning "i write Walt Whit- man on a wall."]

Carlsmith, Caroline. "playing nomic with Walt Whitman." in mariana Bar- reto and Katie hartsock, eds., I Might Not Tell Everybody But I Will Tell You (evanston, il: transatlantic Whitman association, 2013), 35-47. [poem about the author playing the game "nomic" (a game based on continual rule changes) with Whitman.]

Coviello, peter. "Whitman's Children." PMLA 128 ( January 2013), 73-86. [offers a close reading of Whitman's letter to the parents of Civil War soldier erastus haskell just after his death in order to focus on "the multiplicity of roles the poet inhabits in [his] war writing (mother, father, nurse, lover, confidant, scribe)" and to read "his acts of surrogacy as efforts to restore carnality, in its world-making force, to family and, in particular, to parent- hood," calling this "Whitman's project of queer generation," a project "to enlarge the vision of sex and sexual possibility he had initiated in the 'Cala- mus' poems," and one at least partially realized when two of the soldiers he nursed named their sons after the poet.]

Eckel, leslie elizabeth. Atlantic Citizens: Nineteenth- Century American Writ- ers at Work in the World. edinburgh: edinburgh university press, 2013. [Chapter 6, "Standing upon america: Whitman and the profession of national poetry" (153-188), offers "an extended study of [Whitman's] self- presentation as a national poet in his early editions and reviews of Leaves of Grass, his management of his appearances in print abroad, and his creation of a theory of literary nationhood in Democratic Vistas and other later prose writings" in order to examine "the techniques that Whitman employed to fuse his poetic persona with a concept of american nationality that would only make sense with Whitman himself at its core"; concludes by analyzing "those lessons that modernist writers learned from W hitman about how to construct professional artistic personae and how to aggressively define the 'modern. …