Chronology: Iraq

Article excerpt

See also, Regional, Afghanistan

2002

Oct. 15: Election results in the Iraqi election were a %100 "Yes" for another seven-year term for Saddam Husayn. When the voters were asked what would happen if they voted "No," they "responded by putting their index fingers to their temples and pulling the trigger." [FT, 10/16]

Oct. 21: The US exerted pressure on the UN Security Council to adopt its resolution. The US dropped its proposal to have armed enforcement of inspectors, but was still insistent on a tough new inspection and a provision for "serious consequences" in the case of an Iraqi violation of disarmament. Russia and France remain the main force of opposition to this resolution. [WP, 10/24]

Oct. 23: Allied jets bombed two military air defense sites, one near al-Jarrah and one near Tallil, both in the "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq. The strikes were launched in response to Iraqi antiaircraft artillery, which was fired at coalition aircrafts on patrol. [WP, 10/24]

Nov. 19: UN Secretary General Kofi Annan said that Iraq's use of anti-aircraft defense against US and British planes over the no-fly zones in Iraq did not constitute a breach of UN Resolution 1441 as US officials had suggested. [FT, 11/20]

Nov. 21: At a NATO Summit, the 19 allies issued a communique that said all were committed to taking "effective action" to ensure the disarmament of Iraq. However, no NATO forces or military assets were committed to an invasion. [FT, 11/22]

Nov. 26: The first 19 United Nations inspectors arrived in Baghdad. Iraqi officials maintained that the country did not possess weapons of mass destruction, and expressed reservations about allowing inspectors inside of Iraqi President Saddam Husayn's palaces. [NYT, 11/26]

Iraqi intellectuals in exile produced a report entitled "The Transition to Democracy in Iraq", detailing a 2-3 year transition to a democracy in the event that Saddam Husayn was removed from office. [NYT, 11/26]

Dec. 1: Iraq claimed that 4 civilians were killed during the bombing of an office building of the Southern Oil Company in southern Iraq by US and British planes. US officials said that they had bombed a communications facility in southern Iraq after Iraqi anti-aircraft guns had fired on allied jets. [NYT, FT, 12/2]

Dec. 2: UN weapons inspectors surprised Iraqi officials by conducting inspections of three alcohol distilleries. The inspectors did not comment on what they found at the sites. [WP, 12/3]

Britain released a report produced in consultation with the Bush administration detailing human rights abuses in Iraq. The abuses reported included torture, rape, and murder, and the dossier called Iraq "a terrifying place to live." [WP, 12/3] UN inspectors examined an airfield in search of aircrafts capable of disseminating biological weapons. [WSJ, 12/2]

Dec. 3: UN Secretary General Kofi Annan challenged the US's negative assessment of the first week of weapons inspections in Iraq. [WP, 12/4]

UN weapons inspectors paid a surprise visit to one of Saddam Husayn's lavish palaces. They were allowed entry and were able to search all parts of the palace. The inspectors did not comment on what they found. [WP, 12/4]

Dec. 4: US and British aircraft bombed targets near Mosul after coming under anti-aircraft fire in the northern no-fly zone. [FT, 12/5]

Dec. 5: Renewed fighting broke out between Kurdish forces and Ansar al-Islam guerrilla forces along the Iran-Iraq border. It was believed that as many as 42 Kurdish combatants were killed, and only 10 guerilla militants. [NYT, 12/5]

Dec. 7: The Bush administration told UN inspectors that it would withhold intelligence information on suspected Iraqi weapons sites until after it had had a chance to analyze Iraq's weapons declaration. [WP, 12/7/02]

Dec. 8: Iraq delivered a 12,000 page declaration to the United Nations on the status of banned nuclear weapons and weapons development programs in Iraq. …